Posts Tagged ‘drug’

Locoweed is Well Named

October 15, 2008

Okay, that’s simply one of it’s street names, along with Stinkweed, Jimson Weed, Devil’s Apple, and Thornapple. But it’s probably the best common descriptor for Datura stramonium.

According to the Canadian Journal of Emergency Medicine, the plant “is a member of the nightshade family and is a common weed growing along roadways and in pastures in southern Canada and the United States. Most troublingly, it says that it’s used (usually by teenagers) for “hallucinogenic and euphoric effect” and “Jimson weed parties are becoming more common” despite the fact that it “can cause acute anticholinergic poisoning and death in humans and animals.” 01

In 2000 it was “linked to at least one death in the Niagara Region” where it grows naturally. In 2003 “a 13-year-old boy landed in the intensive care unit after eating the plant.” In 2005 “a Simcoe boy went into a coma and was airlifted to Sick Kids hospital in Toronto” after ingesting it. In 2006 “four Hamilton teens were sent to hospital after smoking jimson-laced cigarettes during their lunch break at school.” In 2007 “three males, ages 14 to 17, were found in an incoherent and unresponsive state” after eating it’s seeds. 02

Today’s paper reports it’s use by local youth as well. “On Saturday, a 16-year-old girl was found incoherent on Commissioners Road … several others youths have been treated after ingesting the seeds during recent weeks.” 03

Sources:
01. Teenagers with Jimson Weed Poisoning
02. 3 Teens Poisoned…
03. Jimson weed seed dangerous if ingested

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Stepping on Cannabis, Worse than Doggy Doo

February 8, 2008

If you have any plans to visit or simply pass through the UAE, you might want to rethink them.

(more…)

BookCrossing Release – 2008/02/07

February 7, 2008



Read and Release at BookCrossing.com...

Become a BC London Ambassador!

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  Title: Strong Medicine
  Location: LTC
#16 (Adelaide) northbound;
London, Ontario
  Time: 11:30 a.m.
 
  To learn more, click here.

Miracle drugs save lives and ease suffering, but for profit-motivated companies, the miracle is the money they generate…at any cost. Billions of dollars in profits will make men and women do many things-lie, cheat, even kill. now one beautiful woman will be caught in the cross fire between ethics and profits. As Celia Jordan’s fast-track career sweeps her into the highest circles of an international drug company, she begins to discover the sins and secrets hidden in the research lab…and in the marketplace. Now the company’s powerful new drug promises a breakthrough in treating a deadly disease. But Celia Jordan knows it may deliver a nightmare.

graphic

CUPE’s Poverty Reduction Proposal

January 28, 2008

CUPE Ontario will make a deputation this afternoon that will propose three policy shifts that the government must make in order to achieve a reduction of poverty in the province…

(more…)

Baseball… busted!

December 13, 2007

add to del.icio.us  Add to Blinkslist  add to furl  Digg it  add to ma.gnolia  Stumble It!  add to simpy  seed the vine  Reddit  Fark  TailRank

After months of interviews and millions of dollars investigating the use of steroids by major league baseball players, George Mitchell released a damning report earlier today.

For more than a decade there has been widespread illegal use of anabolic steroids and other performance enhancing substances by players in Major League Baseball.”

To read the full report, CLICK HERE.

(more…)

MRSA Superbug

October 16, 2007

According to the U.S. government, a drug-resistant staf superbug called methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is now responsible for infections in as many as 90,000 Americans every year. The bacteria can be carried by healthy people, living on their skin or in their noses, and spreads through hospitals, prisons, gyms and locker rooms, and in poor urban neighborhoods. Although drug-resistant staph cases historically only result in mild skin infections, those that enter the bloodstream or destroy flesh and can turn deadly.

Links:
2007/09/13: FMBS – Tackling Superbugs
2007/06/11: FMBS – Assassin Bugs in Canada?
2007/10: CDC – Rapid increase of MRSA, Copenhagen
2007/10/16: Boston Globe – Staph fatalities may exceed AIDS deaths
2007/10/16: JAMA – Invasive MRSA Infections in the United States
2007/10/17: IHT – Bacterial infection killed almost 19,000 in 2005
2007/11/07: Salon – Is the way we raise our food…

High-Risk Policing

June 12, 2007

Former Judge George Ferguson was retained in November 2001 by Toronto’s Police Chief. His report was completed in January 2003 and subsequently made public in March 2004. In it, the former Judge recommended drug testing, psychological testing and financial background checks on police officers in defined high risk positions. However, according to the Toronto Police Accountability Coalition in January 2005, Toronto Police Association President Dave Wilson was said to oppose those recommendations as being “fundamentally unacceptable to our members” and as having indicated that they would be challenged by the Association “at every level.”

In the wake of the recent tragedy involving Dave Lucio and Kelly Johnson, I’m interested to know whether these recommendations have ever been adopted by London Police Services. I’ll try to find out and let you know.

2006 Fowler Election Platform – Needle Disposal Bins

October 4, 2006

as originally posted on my Election Website

Some of what I’ve had to say in the past

Date: Tue, 10 Jan 2006 16:47:05 -0500 (EST)
From: “Gregory Fowler”
Subject: Failure to Communicate
To: “Sandy White”
CC: adecicco@london.ca, jsher@lfpress.com, pmcleod@thelondoner.ca, John.Wilsons@corusent.com, newstalk1290today@cjbk.com

Sandy,

With respect to the issue of Needle Disposal Bins.

Since there’s been no response from Mr. Irwin at the Central Library, or from anyone at the London Middlesex Health Unit, or from Councillor Eagle, or from Councillor Tranquilli …

and as I’ve expressed to you before, this is terrible behaviour on the part of people who are paid out of the public purse…

Please visit my web blog and review my letters of 2006/01/07 which you will find in the “Library Services” archive.

Perhaps you are in a better position to make inquiries and to get answers than what I am.

[snip]

Sincerely,

Mr. Greg Fowler

email: fowgre@yahoo.ca
smail: 962 Eagle Crescent; London, Ontario; N5Z 3H7
Blog: ca.geocities.com/fowgre/
phone: (519) 649-0500

Date: Sat, 7 Jan 2006 07:51:27 -0500 (EST)
From: “Gregory Fowler”
Subject: Fwd: Info Request – Needle Disposal
To: igillespie@lfpress.com, jsher@lfpress.com
CC: bill.irwin@lpl.london.on.ca, health@mlhu.on.ca, seagle@london.ca, ftranqui@london.ca

Mr. Gillespie,

With respect to “the wisdom of placing needle dispenser bins in the washrooms at London’s Central Library on Dundas Street.”

I agree with you that nobody has a “right” to do drugs in the library. And I suppose I have some concern that the presence of dispenser bins might attract persons with serious drug addictions and behavioural problems to the library who otherwise would not be there.

My biggest concern though, is for the safety of library workers. And my presumption is that the bins will result in greater safety for those workers, even if they don’t resolve the problem of unsafe disposal in it’s entirety.

Your suggestion that “accommodating drug users is driving away legitimate patrons” would have been easier to accept if you had prefixed the word “patrons” with a qualifier, such as “some.” I am the organizer of the Forest City Backgammon Club, which conducts it’s meetings 6-9pm on Thursday evenings on the Central Library’s 3rd floor. Even after polling some of the membership on this issue, I have received no expressions of concern about the issue.

As a father and a grandfather, I think that your valid concern for the safety of children (“do you really want your children to visit a library where addicts are shooting up in the washroom?”) might better have been accompanied by a reminder that things like drug use, sexual predators, etc. are a larger societal problem than at this one location, and that children should never be left unattended in public washrooms.

Given my public advocacy over the past decade for increased budgets for police and other essential services, I’m a bit uncomfortable with the quote attributed to Mr. Irwin that “London police’s foot patrol officers regularly tour the library.”

I don’t believe that the police need to attend at the library regularly. But what concerns me about the quote is that many people will misinterpret “regularly” and come to the impression that the police are there (or anyplace else) frequently. And that will simply compound the folly of the notion that we can continue to exert pressure on the police budget without negative consequeces.

What interests me most about this issue, is whether or not the Library Board made it’s decision in isolation, or if it consulted with other community stakeholders first? Is there a broader approach to the problem of needle disposal, with leadership coming from Council and the Health Unit?

Some of what I’ve had to say in the past

Date: Tue, 10 Jan 2006 16:47:05 -0500 (EST)From: “Gregory Fowler”Subject: Failure to CommunicateTo: “Sandy White”CC: adecicco@london.ca, jsher@lfpress.com, pmcleod@thelondoner.ca, John.Wilsons@corusent.com, newstalk1290today@cjbk.com

Sandy,

With respect to the issue of Needle Disposal Bins.

Since there’s been no response from Mr. Irwin at the Central Library, or from anyone at the London Middlesex Health Unit, or from Councillor Eagle, or from Councillor Tranquilli …

and as I’ve expressed to you before, this is terrible behaviour on the part of people who are paid out of the public purse…

Please visit my web blog and review my letters of 2006/01/07 which you will find in the “Library Services” archive.

Perhaps you are in a better position to make inquiries and to get answers than what I am.

[snip]

Sincerely,

Mr. Greg Fowler

email: fowgre@yahoo.casmail: 962 Eagle Crescent; London, Ontario; N5Z 3H7Blog: ca.geocities.com/fowgre/phone: (519) 649-0500

Date: Sat, 7 Jan 2006 07:51:27 -0500 (EST)From: “Gregory Fowler”Subject: Fwd: Info Request – Needle DisposalTo: igillespie@lfpress.com, jsher@lfpress.comCC: bill.irwin@lpl.london.on.ca, health@mlhu.on.ca, seagle@london.ca, ftranqui@london.ca

Mr. Gillespie,

With respect to “the wisdom of placing needle dispenser bins in the washrooms at London’s Central Library on Dundas Street.”

I agree with you that nobody has a “right” to do drugs in the library. And I suppose I have some concern that the presence of dispenser bins might attract persons with serious drug addictions and behavioural problems to the library who otherwise would not be there.

My biggest concern though, is for the safety of library workers. And my presumption is that the bins will result in greater safety for those workers, even if they don’t resolve the problem of unsafe disposal in it’s entirety.

Your suggestion that “accommodating drug users is driving away legitimate patrons” would have been easier to accept if you had prefixed the word “patrons” with a qualifier, such as “some.” I am the organizer of the Forest City Backgammon Club, which conducts it’s meetings 6-9pm on Thursday evenings on the Central Library’s 3rd floor. Even after polling some of the membership on this issue, I have received no expressions of concern about the issue.

As a father and a grandfather, I think that your valid concern for the safety of children (“do you really want your children to visit a library where addicts are shooting up in the washroom?”) might better have been accompanied by a reminder that things like drug use, sexual predators, etc. are a larger societal problem than at this one location, and that children should never be left unattended in public washrooms.

Given my public advocacy over the past decade for increased budgets for police and other essential services, I’m a bit uncomfortable with the quote attributed to Mr. Irwin that “London police’s foot patrol officers regularly tour the library.”

I don’t believe that the police need to attend at the library regularly. But what concerns me about the quote is that many people will misinterpret “regularly” and come to the impression that the police are there (or anyplace else) frequently. And that will simply compound the folly of the notion that we can continue to exert pressure on the police budget without negative consequeces.

What interests me most about this issue, is whether or not the Library Board made it’s decision in isolation, or if it consulted with other community stakeholders first? Is there a broader approach to the problem of needle disposal, with leadership coming from Council and the Health Unit?