Posts Tagged ‘test’

Food Additive Safety

December 16, 2007

Today’s Daily Telegraph warns that “HUNDREDS of popular Australian children’s snack foods and sweets are laced with suspect additives which international researchers have linked to adverse behavioural reactions…such as allergies, asthma, hyperactivity and rashes.”

According to Health Canada, “Generally speaking, a food additive is any chemical substance added to a food during manufacturing or processing that becomes a part of the food or affects the food’s characteristics, such as its colour or texture. Some food additives are derived from natural sources. Others are made synthetically.”

Only food additives listed in the Tables of Division 16 in the Food and Drug Regulations are permitted to be used in food.
(source: Health Canada)

The Health Products & Food Branch of Health Canada is responsible for evaluating and approving new food additives. The legislative mechanisms under which the Government of Canada controls them are the Food and Drugs Act and the Food and Drug Regulations. And the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) enforces Canada’s food labelling laws and the food safety standards set by Health Canada.

Links:
Health Canada: National Surveillance of…Hazardous Chemicals in Foods
EFSA: Food Additives
Action On Additives website
2004/05/25 – The Independent: Artificial colorings…boost…hyperactivity…
2007/05/08 – Food Standards Agency: Additives and children’s behaviour
2007/05/09 – Daily Telegraph: New evidence links E-numbers to hyperactivity
2007/05/12 – Daily Telegraph: Tantrum-linked additives in 132 new products
2007/09/ – Food Standards Agency: Intolerance to additives
2007/09/06 – Food Standards Agency: …revised advice on…artificial colours
2007/09/06 – Daily Telegraph: Parents warned about artificial food additives
2007/09/06 – BBC: Parents warned of additives link
2007/09/17 – TimesOnline: Subtracting the additives

Rationalizations

November 26, 2007

An XKCD sketch.
alphabetical grades

Safer Streets in Nova Scotia

November 24, 2007

Nova Scotia’s Transportation Minister, Murray Scott, has introduced amendments to that province’s Motor Vehicle Act that appear to hold a promise of increased safety for pedestrians.

An 18-month pilot program would allow police to install photo-radar cameras capable of nabbing speeders and red light runners.

Another provision would ban the use of hand-held cellphones while driving.

Drivers who fail to yield for pedestrians at crosswalks would see a doubling of fines: $500 for a first offence, $1,000 for a second and $2,000 for a third.

Can you hear me applauding?

Links:
2007/11/15 – CBC: Ban cell phones (audio)
2007/11/24 – Globe & Mail: N.S. government to make streets safer

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Human Nature = ZAP!

November 21, 2007

An XKCD sketch.
The Difference

Infrastructure Experiment

November 14, 2007

Toilet iconWhile the attention of so many Londoners is on infrastructure issues, like sewers, now might be a good time to do some public education. Over on How Stuff Works, they answer the question “What if everybody…flushed the toilet at the same time?

Hmmm.

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High-Risk Policing

June 12, 2007

Former Judge George Ferguson was retained in November 2001 by Toronto’s Police Chief. His report was completed in January 2003 and subsequently made public in March 2004. In it, the former Judge recommended drug testing, psychological testing and financial background checks on police officers in defined high risk positions. However, according to the Toronto Police Accountability Coalition in January 2005, Toronto Police Association President Dave Wilson was said to oppose those recommendations as being “fundamentally unacceptable to our members” and as having indicated that they would be challenged by the Association “at every level.”

In the wake of the recent tragedy involving Dave Lucio and Kelly Johnson, I’m interested to know whether these recommendations have ever been adopted by London Police Services. I’ll try to find out and let you know.